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8 reasons you should be so grateful for your dog this Thanksgiving

Why you should be thankful for your dog — not only on Thanksgiving, but year-round

Ah, Thanksgiving — the best time of year to be a dog! Everyone has food. There’s always someone to play with. And naps are readily encouraged. Between having you at home and getting to try delicious human food, your pup certainly has a lot to be thankful for!

Let’s turn the tables, though: Why are you grateful for your dog? Maybe it’s their companionship or the never-ending ways they make you laugh. Many pup parents know just how tricky it is to narrow down the reasons why their furry friend lights up their life, especially when each dog has their own adorable personality and quirks.

Below are just eight of the infinite reasons why you should be thankful for your dog this November. What would you add to the list?

Yellow lab begs at the Thanksgiving table
Image used with permission by copyright holder

1. They’re the perfect cuddle buddy for chilly fall days — exactly like Thanksgiving morning!

As winter creeps closer, you and your fur baby will surely start to notice a change in the weather. Odds are, the trees have already let go of their leaves, and maybe you and your pup are bundled up in their winter wear as we speak.

Since it’s the cozy season, you may want to indulge in a few cuddles with your furry friend while you watch Macy’s annual Thanksgiving Day Parade from the comfort of your couch. Even a little lap dog can feel as warm as a big fleece blanket, so what are you waiting for? Get your snuggle on!

A dog sits on a chair next to a dining room set for Thanksgiving
nzozo / Shutterstock

2. Who needs a vacuum when you have a dog? They’ll pick up anything you drop this Thanksgiving

Instead of stressing out over creating a spotless home, let your pup get in on the cleaning action. They’ll be the first on the scene in the event of any edible spills — it’ll be like nothing even fell in the first place! In all seriousness, though, do keep an eye on what your dog gets their chompers on.

They can be a fantastic companion while you get ready for the holidays, whether you’re cleaning, cooking, or decorating. Plus, how cute do they look among all the fall colors?

A Shiba Inu dog looks back at the camera with a pumpkin and autumn leaves on the ground behind
NancyP5 / Shutterstock

3. Your pup is the perfect “pawtner” for Thanksgiving activities, whether it’s football, cooking, or cuddles

No matter what time of day it is or what you’re planning to do, your pup is up for a party — though we don’t blame you if your idea of “partying” includes a nap or two. A good meal and a rest are two of human life’s simplest pleasures, and there’s no reason your canine companion shouldn’t enjoy a seasonal snooze and a special (dog-friendly) meal too.

Your dog may also enjoy a round of football or Frisbee before Thanksgiving dinner, especially if you include your whole family. Even if your doggo doesn’t play by the rules, they’re sure to be the star player.

A brown dog wearing a pumpkin headband poses next to a box of autumn vegetables
Image used with permission by copyright holder

4. Dogs put smiles on faces and provide endless entertainment, whether you’re a guest or their owner

Whether scooting in for a cuddle or stealing a turkey drumstick off the dinner table, dogs are endlessly entertaining. You can never expect the same thing twice, especially when it comes to fun family gatherings. Even though you may have to chase down your fur baby for the remnants of your dinner, your family will be too busy laughing to notice the rumpus your sneaky pup has caused.

Two Pembroke Welsh corgis chew on a pumpkin on an autumn picnic
Image used with permission by copyright holder

5. They’ll help take care of the leftovers — the canine-safe ones, that is!

If your fridge is a bit too packed after a successful Thanksgiving, there’s someone in your house who’s more than willing to help out. There are many safe Thanksgiving foods for dogs, including pumpkin, sweet potatoes, and carefully prepared turkey.

Make sure not to overfeed your dog or swap out too much of their regular food. Even safe ingredients can cause stomach upset in more sensitive pups. Turns out there can be too much of a good thing!

Two cute dogs sitting wearing turkey Thanksgiving hats
Image used with permission by copyright holder

6. Dogs don’t judge, not even while you’re stuffing your face

There’s almost nothing that matches a dog’s unconditional love. No matter who you are or what you do, your four-legged friend will always be your biggest fan. They’ll be there for you after the Thanksgiving feast, when you swear that you’ll never eat so much again. (And they’ll be there next year when you say the very same thing.)

A young man sits with his arm around his dog in front of a lake with their backs to the camera
Aleksey Boyko / Shutterstock

7. You (and your food) will have your dog’s attention all day long. It’s a dream come true!

Where are the food-motivated pups at? This one’s for you!

Be prepared to have a Velcro pet for the day! Thanksgiving is basically Christmas for dogs who love a good snack (all dogs, in other words), so don’t be afraid to indulge them a little, but not before taking advantage of their increased alertness, of course. Training time, anyone?

A black labradoodle stands in a pile of autumn leaves

8. They really are your best friend, 365 days of the year

Whether it’s Thanksgiving, Halloween, or any day of the year, it’s always a good idea to be consciously grateful for the best bud by your side. Just think of all the memories you’ve made together and all the hard times your sweet pup has helped you through. Dogs will love you purely, whether you’re sharing festive activities or just sharing snacks, so take in every moment!

A Bloodhound sneezing as autumn leaves fall around him
Image used with permission by copyright holder

There’s no shortage of reasons to be thankful for your beloved pupper, and it’s the perfect time to celebrate them. Whether you write out a list of what you’re grateful for or just take a few moments to reflect, make sure to pencil in some time for just you and your best buddy this Thanksgiving — even if it’s only for a nap or a walk.

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Gabrielle LaFrank
Gabrielle LaFrank has written for sites such as Psych2Go, Elite Daily, and, currently, PawTracks. When she's not writing, you…
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