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Video: Dogs put their fight on pause to take a water break

Why do dogs play fight? It's mostly just about fun

Dogs are adorable when they play: the jumping up and down, arm locking, and goofy grins make it worth watching and recording. But just like when a kid runs around the playground and needs a break, dogs do too. This particular happy corgi stops mid-play to rush in for a water break, only to resume the game as soon as she finishes.

The video begins with dogs fighting: a corgi outside of an open door, leaping up and down playfully at their companion, who remains inside. The voiceover tells us: “The dog really took a water break mid-argument.”

The corgi quickly waddles inside to all but attack the dog water — it must have been a tiring play session. As soon as the dog’s thirst is satiated, they whip around and walk back out to jump up at the glass again. Meanwhile, their golden retriever friend just stares at the door, waiting for them to return. They both seem to love leaping up at each other, but with a safety barrier in between.

Comments lauded the little corgi for getting the water they needed and their opponent for waiting. “Bro paused the fight?,” said abchgfyyyy. He should definitely get a “Good Boy” for waiting until his friend has finished the water break.

official_bluetangomango took the other side and remarked: “Bro walked in so innocently too?. We think she walked in with a touch of sass.”

As mxta2k explained, humans experience something like this too: “What my mom expects me to do when she says pause the game,” he stated.

Finally, oalnplayer commented what we’re all thinking: “Professionals have standards.” These dogs definitely do.

Two Labrador puppies play with each other until one gives up by two
manushot / Shutterstock

Why do dogs play fight?

It’s no surprise that puppies play as a way to learn and train themselves. Dogs playing with their littermates is a part of that since it helps them bond with each other and develop some coordination (which they definitely need). In adult dogs, play fights serve as a source of exercise and communication — and maybe our pups just like to have fun. However, while there’s no harm in a little running around, you do want to ensure that the fight doesn’t turn aggressive. If you pay close enough attention, you should be able to tell. Look for these signs that it’s still a game:

  • Play bowing
  • Short, high-pitched barks and growls
  • Falling and rolling
  • Sneezing

Dogs do these moves specifically to tell their opponent that it’s all in good fun. When you see your dog doing any of these things, you shouldn’t worry too much that she’s stressed by the fight or that you need to intervene. Instead, perhaps you should reach for the water bowl to make sure her drink is ready when she needs a break.

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Rebekkah Adams
Rebekkah’s been a writer and editor for more than 10 years, both in print and digital. In addition to writing about pets…
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