Is your dog constipated? Try these simple tricks to make him poop quickly

Ah, the glamours of pet parenthood. Poop bags, potty training, and all that fun stuff — but what about when your fur baby is battling a bout of constipation? If it doesn’t seem to resolve itself after a few days, you may want to step in and help your four-legged friend get things moving regularly again.

Although your veterinarian will happily intervene if you need an extra hand or a word of advice, it’s completely safe (and surprisingly easy) to help relieve your dog’s constipation from home. There are plenty of foods that will have the desired effect, or you can opt for a gentle supplement, medication, or even lifestyle changes.

Here’s how to make a dog poop quickly — you know, under desperate circumstances. Good luck, and don’t forget the air freshener.

An Airedale Terrier squats to poop in a grassy field

How do you make a constipated dog poop fast?

While some remedies are safe to try from home, others should be done only by a veterinary professional — don’t worry, we’ll specify which is which.

Powdered fiber supplement

One over-the-counter solution for canine constipation is a fiber supplement, just like Native Pet’s Organic Pumpkin Fiber Powder. Pumpkin, the main ingredient in this supplement, has a unique combination of fiber and moisture that can relieve both constipation and diarrhea. This is certainly a useful investment if you have a pup with tummy troubles.

If you’re up for a visit to the vet, they can recommend other supplements and medications to make bowel movements more regular, though they may be stronger and have more side effects than what you can find in pet stores.

Enema

The American Kennel Club (AKC) notes that this is a constipation-relief method you should never attempt from home. Canine enemas should always be done under the care of a licensed veterinary professional, as they are quite invasive and often uncomfortable. Even so, they are effective and safe when performed correctly, and it may be the most effective option in more severe cases.

What home remedy can I give my dog for constipation?

There are a few things you can do right from home if your dog seems a little stopped up — no vet appointment required! Here are some to try:

Canned dog food

Surprisingly, the extra moisture in canned dog food can help some pooches re-regulate over time (via AKC). This probably won’t work overnight but can be a convenient and delicious strategy for getting rid of chronic constipation.

Hydration

As mentioned above, moisture and water (whether in food or on its own) are great for the digestive system. Encourage your dog to drink more water if you can, but you can always add a bit of chicken broth to it to entice him.

The AKC lists electrolyte supplements as another helpful tool for maintaining hydration. Many pet pharmacies and stores carry supplements such as Hydrade, so your pup won’t have to wait to feel better.

Lifestyle changes

Whether constipation was a one-time issue or a recurring problem, ensuring that your furry friend has a regular exercise routine will help prevent this from happening again. Even a daily walk and some playtime will keep everything moving smoothly if you know what we mean.

A man picks up dog poop with a bag with his dog next to him

What foods make dogs poop quickly?

Since a lack of fiber is a common reason for constipation in canines, foods that contain fiber can help your dog achieve and maintain regular bowel movements.

Prescription dog food

For chronic constipation, your veterinarian may recommend switching your pup to a high-fiber prescription dog food. Always consult your vet before making a choice like this, to make sure that you’re switching to the right food for your dog’s needs.

Pumpkin

Believe it or not, pumpkin has some magical gastrointestinal properties. The gourd itself is high in fiber, but canned pumpkin contains high amounts of water, too. It can help pups with both diarrhea and constipation — and it’s delicious!

Herbal constipation relief for dogs

If medication isn’t up your alley, there are a few oils, seeds, and herbs that may do the trick. The AKC lists powdered psyllium seeds, fig paste, wheat bran, and olive oil as a few ingredients that can have a laxative property.

Just because a food helps people regulate themselves, though, doesn’t mean it will do the same for dogs — at least safely. Always check with your veterinarian before adding a new human food to your pooch’s diet, especially if he’s been dealing with constipation.

Whatever you decide to try out first, don’t feel discouraged if your dog isn’t all better right away. Even the most effective techniques can take some time. Don’t forget, your vet is always there if you need a hand — no worries!

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