Skip to main content

How long can an old dog live with a heart murmur?

Learning that your senior dog has a heart condition can feel devastating. It forces you to contemplate the idea that your best friend won’t be around forever. But while the diagnosis of a heart murmur can be scary, there is no reason to jump to the worst-case scenario. Murmurs range in severity; while some are serious, others are less so. Before you start frantically Googling “old dog heart murmur life expectancy,” keep reading to learn more about the different types of heart murmurs, the prognosis, and what you can do to help your pup live a long and content life.

Man in a plaid shirt hugging his dog

What is a heart murmur?

Much like us, dogs’ hearts pump blood throughout their bodies, creating a steady beat that can be heard through a stethoscope. If there is a disturbance in the blood flow, it creates a noise distinct from a regular heartbeat called a murmur. There are a few different ways vets classify heart murmurs; these include type, grade, and configuration.

The type is based on when in the beating cycle the murmur takes place. The three types of murmur are systolic, diastolic, and continuous; knowing the type of murmur can help the vet determine its cause. The grade of the murmur lets the veterinarian know how loud it is. Murmurs are graded on a scale of one to six, with one being barely detectable with a stethoscope and six being the most severe and loudest. The doctor will also be able to uncover the heart murmur’s configuration. This classification describes the way murmurs sound and separates them into four categories: plateau, crescendo-decrescendo, decrescendo, and machinery. Your vet can explain which of these categories your dog’s murmur fits into so you can learn more about their condition.

Sad dog laying on the floor

How serious is a heart murmur in older dogs?

In general, murmurs can be difficult to predict because there are so many varieties and degrees of severity. As such, life expectancies differ based on a few factors, including the type of murmur and even the breed of dog. Some pups can have murmurs for years without ever developing heart disease. Others, though, may progress to congestive heart failure rapidly. Certain breeds are more likely to develop heart disease, like Chihuahuas, Boxers, Dobermans, and Cavalier King Charles spaniels. But even with congestive heart failure, pups can survive for years with medication and attentive care.

While they may sound scary, heart murmurs are not always dangerous. If your senior pup has a low-grade murmur and no accompanying symptoms, there is little cause to worry. Your vet will likely recommend monitoring your dog’s condition to make sure it doesn’t decline. Keep in mind also that heart murmurs typically occur in older dogs because of an underlying health condition. Many of these causes are treatable and may even resolve on their own. However, in more severe cases, and especially with older dogs, the outlook may be more guarded. Your veterinarian is the best person to talk to about your dog’s prognosis.

Vet using a stethoscope on a dog

Monitoring and treatment can help your dog’s health outlook

Early diagnosis and treatment are key to giving your pup the best chances of survival. It’s crucial to know that vets don’t treat the heart murmur itself; they focus on the symptoms and underlying issues associated with the murmur. The treatment plan and prognosis both depend on the cause of the murmur. Follow all of the vet’s recommendations and keep a close eye on your pet’s health to assess whether the murmur indicates a more serious heart condition. You should also research the symptoms of heart disease in dogs so you know more about what to watch for.

The vet may recommend that you monitor your pup’s breathing rate when he’s resting or sleeping, as well as his diet and activity levels. They can also advise you on which type of dog food is best for your dog’s condition. General guidelines are that dogs with heart disease must be on a low-sodium diet. You’ll also need to keep an eye on your pet’s potassium and phosphorus levels.

The veterinarian can also tell you how much exercise your dog should be getting. Too much strenuous activity can be hazardous for a pup with heart disease.

In addition to extending their life, one of the main goals of heart disease treatment is ensuring the dog retains a high quality of life post-diagnosis. By working with your dog’s vet, monitoring the dog’s condition, and managing their health properly, you can help ensure that they continue to live a happy life for as long as possible.

Don’t give up hope

When anyone brings up a heart murmur, you likely assume the worst. But the causes of murmurs in canines are so widespread, and the severity depends on so many factors, that it’s difficult to know what to expect just from those two little words. There is still hope for your dog; many pups, even older ones, can live long, happy lives after their diagnosis. Your veterinarian can provide more clarity on your dog’s condition and what to expect in the coming months and years. With an early diagnosis, expert treatment, and regular monitoring, you can provide your dog the best life possible, even with a heart murmur.

Editors' Recommendations