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Can large cats enjoy a cat tree? Here are the ones to get

Cat trees for large cats might be hard to find, but you can get the right one

Large black cat sits in her cat tree
Image used with permission by copyright holder

While you probably know that your dog needs a decent amount of exercise, you might not realize that your cat does, too. Experts estimate that most indoor cats don’t get enough exercise, and as many as 40% could be overweight or obese. Some big kitties might need a bit more, just as would be true for many dogs. One way to help encourage their heart rate is to gift them a structure. A cat tree for large cats will stimulate both their bodies and their minds.

Why do our felines love cat trees?

In the wild, cats climb trees, every one of those felines, from your escaped house cat to lions and leopards — they all love to get height. You might also see your indoor pet trying to do the same in your house with mixed success. Many pet parents investigate a sudden noise to find their little jumper now sitting on top of the cabinets or on a bookcase. If you give them a cat tree, that will satisfy much of their need to climb. It also allows the kitty to have space to themselves up high when they want to get out of the way and burn a few of those calories.

What are the benefits of a cat tree?

Cats love to climb whether they live inside, outside, or both. Some owners like to mimic the great outdoors by installing a cat tree indoors. It should be fun for your kitty, but it will also have health benefits. This is a great way to give them a little exercise, a scratching post, and mental stimulation. Make sure to pick the right one, depending on your cat’s size, interests, and behaviors.

Which one should I get for my big cat?

A large cat needs a sturdy cat tree! Stick to a few of these bigger and safer ones that will work perfectly for your larger animal.

FEANDREA 67-inch Multi-Level Cat Tree for Large Cats

This tree, aptly billed as “Exclusive Luxury for Cats,” will give them plenty to do no matter what mood hits them. With this cat tree, your feline has multiple heights, hidey holes, and balls to bat on. Most importantly, it’s incredibly stable and boasts high reviews — a distinguished 4.8. One top reviewer said their 20-pound beastie even fit on it, so this one works well if you have a big kitty.

Furhaven Tiger Tough Cat Tree Double Decker Playground

While the Feandrea has many options and so looks quite compact, this Furhaven tree has a more spacious and airy feel to it, but it still has plenty of attributes. Your kitty might enjoy the various activities that encourage them to play and stretch their brain, like the IQ busy box. Reviewers comment that it’s easy to assemble and since the tower is tall, it’ll work well for your big animal.

Amazon Basics Multi-Level Cat Tree Indoor Climbing Activity Cat Tower

Our last pick is slightly smaller but a great deal for the price and will still hold up for your big creature. It also has a number of different tiers and scratching posts galore. The current top reviewer remarks this the model is a “well-built and sturdy cat tree,” and many go on to mention the good price.

While you might have to do a bit more research, it’s absolutely possible to find the perfect cat tree even for a monster kitty that has a little extra weight on them. This will give your furry friend a lot to do safely while also engaging their mind and keeping them healthy.

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Rebekkah Adams
Rebekkah’s been a writer and editor for more than 10 years, both in print and digital. In addition to writing about pets…
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