The right ways to cook chicken for your dog

Dogs with dental issues, sensitive digestive systems, or special dietary needs can benefit from a chicken-based diet. Chicken is an excellent source of lean protein, omega 6, and glucosamine. Feeding your dog a fresh, human-grade diet can lead to a shinier coat, hydrated skin, and healthy bones. Here are the right ways to cook chicken for your dog to enjoy its nutritional benefits and delicious flavor.

Woman feeding dog in kitchen
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Things to know before you feed your dog chicken

Although chicken has a reputation for its mildness, you may be surprised to know there are some possible risks associated with this meat:

• Avoid salmonella or other bacterial infections by cooking chicken thoroughly before feeding it to your dog.

• Plain chicken is best for your pooch. Don’t add any seasoning, onions, or garlic when cooking your dog’s chicken at home.

• Chicken is the third most prevalent food allergy for dogs. If you think your furry friend may be suffering from chicken allergy, remove the ingredient from their diet and contact your vet right away.

• Keep bones out of your dog’s plate. They are a choking hazard and can even puncture your pup’s stomach and intestines.

• Stick to the chicken breast, which is low in fat and healthier for your dog. Fatty foods can lead to pancreatitis in dogs.

How to boil chicken for dogs

Unlike their pet parents, dogs love plain boiled chicken. Their tummies don’t do well with seasoning and their palates actually prefer the natural flavors of chicken. Here’s an easy step-by-step process for you to whip up a dish that your pup will love:

• Place chicken breasts in a medium-size pot with water.

• Cover the pot and bring the water to boil.

• Boil the chicken for 12 minutes over high heat or until completely cooked.

• Shred the cooked chicken and let it cool off to avoid burns.

• Feed your dog a small portion and store leftovers for up to four days.

For dogs with sensitive stomachs

Chicken and rice is a popular recipe that helps dogs that suffer from upset stomachs. Simply prepare white rice without any seasonings and mix it with your dog’s boiled chicken to calm his sensitive stomach.
Keep in mind that brown rice is harder for dogs to digest, so white rice is the best way to go. Also, be sure to leave out any onions or garlic. These plants are toxic to dogs and shouldn’t be fed raw, cooked, fried, or powdered.

Other add-ons

To enhance Fido’s diet, you can add other ingredients that make meals more filling and nutritional. Here are some ideas:

• Plain yogurt: Use it to boost your dog’s protein and calcium intake.

• Canned pumpkin: This is a great source of vitamin A and helps with digestion.

• Cooked veggies: Green beans, carrots, and broccoli add fiber to your pup’s diet. Just keep it under 10% to avoid digestive issues.

• Dog food: Mix the fresh chicken with wet or dry food for a tasty treat and extra flavor.

• Vitamin supplements: Sprinkle powdered dog vitamins on your pooch’s meals to make sure they get all the nutrients they need.

Other cooking methods

Foodie dog parents may want to get more creative in their pup’s meal prep. If you love the health benefits of chicken but want to change things up for your dog, consider baking his chicken. Just place the chicken in an oven-safe container with a little oil to avoid sticking and cook the meat thoroughly at 400º F for 20-30 minutes.

How often should your dog eat chicken?

Chicken breasts are excellent for dogs that need extra protein in their diets – especially if the chicken is free of additives, hormones, or other potentially harmful ingredients. If you don’t want your dog to feed exclusively on chicken or end up rejecting other types of food, limit their chicken meals to once or twice per week.

Chicken is a favorite of most dogs. If you’re looking to give your pup a special treat, this healthy source of protein is sure to leave your furry friend licking their whiskers. Pair it with some rice or veggies and watch your pooch devour!

Just remember to consult with your dog’s vet before making any drastic changes to their diet, especially if you’re concerned about stomach issues or the nutritional balance of your dog’s food.

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