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Howling dog went viral for sounding like an opera singer — we can’t get enough

This video shows a pup who has mastered the art of music with his perfectly on key howling

Many of us think that our dogs talk way beyond the average woofs and barks that we all hear. Some seem to be particularly good at human speech, mimicking our sounds to try to be more like their pet parents. While most beasties never quite make it to speaking to us in our language, others go a step further and decide they will learn to sing too. Singing pups have taken over the internet, and this diva is no different.

If you’ve ever been to the opera, you know to listen for the tell-tale vibrato, which is really just moving between two pitches very quickly. There’s nothing quite like it, and most of us will immediately think of that sound when we listen to this melodious dog.

The hilarious video posted by u/Burlapin to r/howlies (which tells us it’s for “Videos of puppers doing hecking good howlies”) is entitled “A beautiful singer,” and truer words have never been spoken. The top commenter, u/Choice_Bid_7941, noted the perfect breath control right away, remarking, “First time I’ve heard a dog with vibrato!?”

Needless to say, he’s been practicing his arias, but u/pinklavalamp wanted to take it a step further, saying, “Needs an accompanying theremin.”

Lastly, u/The_Aladeen_News decided it was going in another direction, stating he’s actually “Calling the mothership.” No matter what his goal was, you won’t be able to help laughing along to the fuzzball and his music as you watch this clip on repeat.

A dog lies in the grass and howls at the sky
Image used with permission by copyright holder

Why do dogs sing?

As you can imagine, when your pooch decides to start up the singing, they’re really doing a dog howl the fancy way. However, some breeds seem to be particularly inclined to belting out tunes, especially Malamutes and Huskies, who might be extra good at feeling the beat. For the most part, dogs just do this for the same reasons they make any other vocalizations, and you shouldn’t worry, though singing might certainly be a cry for attention, and if you reach for your phone to post it to TikTok, you’re only encouraging him to keep going. What’s a dog’s favorite type of music? This study by the Scottish SPCA says reggae and rock made the top of the canine charts.

If you can’t get enough of this, try playing the video for your pets and see if they decide to dog howl along with the music. You might be able to get your pup to learn how to sing an opera, too, if they’re so inclined. If they don’t seem to get into it right away, pop on a few Bob Marley tunes, and maybe that will get your animal to finally try out his vocal cords and yodel along to the music.

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Rebekkah Adams
Rebekkah’s been a writer and editor for more than 10 years, both in print and digital. In addition to writing about pets…
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