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Pet profiles: Snowflake and Oliver, the feline duo behind our sales team

Welcome back, PawTracks readers! This is Pet Profiles — a monthly series that features some of the beloved pets of the talented guys, gals, and folks behind the magic of Digital Trends Media Group. In case you’re unfamiliar, DTMG is the parent company that runs PawTracks and several other online media outlets.

Whatever you’re doing, it can wait because it’s time for your daily dose of cute. Ready for another furry, four-legged story to put a smile on your face? This month, you’re in for a treat. Not only are we meeting two pets in one interview, but they’re also a bit different than the good boys and girls we’ve gotten acquainted with before. What’s so special, you might ask? They’re cats!

Let’s get to know Snowflake, Oliver, and their human dad, our Sales Director Brian McFarland.

a white cat lies on a bed and pink blanket surrounded by plushies
Brian McFarland/PawTracks

The parent and the pet

Thanks for sharing with us, Brian! Before we get to know your pets, let’s hear a little about you: What do you do here at Digital Trends Media Group? What’s your role?

Sales Director[I] develop and grow clients on my account list and manage those campaigns.

A very important role indeed! Now onto the good stuff: How many pets do you have?

Two cats — Snowflake and Oliver.

Wow — the first cats we’ve featured on Pet Profiles. What an honor! What led you to choose this breed —or, in this case, species — for your home?

They are adopted from North Shore Animal League.

Does this duo fit in well with your lifestyle? We’d love to know why or why not.

Yes; I just like cats, and these two are a lot of fun.

a white cat sits on a purple blanket and looks up at the camera
Brian McFarland/PawTracks

All about Snowflake and Oliver

What are some of your favorite unique behaviors that your cats have?

Oliver enjoys watching television and movies, and Snowflake behaves like a kitten every day, all day.

They sound so darling, and their personalities are so funny! How did you come to welcome these fuzzy felines into your family?

Adoption with my kids.

Thank you for adopting and opening up your home! Since welcoming Snowflake and Oliver, what have you found to be their defining personality traits, and what are some of your favorite moments with them?

Kindness in connecting with me, so we can relax together.

There’s nothing quite like relaxing with a pet. Do your cats have any special needs?

No.

What are Oliver and Snowflake’s favorite toys?

Just stuffed animal things with catnip on them.

What type of food do your precious felines feast on? And where do you get it?

Purina Natural Dry food and Fancy Feast wet from Fresh Direct and Duane Reade.

And, finally: Do you carry pet insurance for your pets?

No.

Thanks so much, Brian, for sharing a bit about Oliver and Snowflake with us. They sound like two sweet kitties with a fun and loving home.  We wish you many years of wonderful memories to come!

PawTracks readers — if you can’t get enough pet love, check out some of our other Pet Profile pieces. Though be forewarned, you won’t find any more cats just yet! So far, we’ve had the pleasure of getting to know canines big and small, from Bethany the Great Dane to tiny Shih Tzu/Pekingese Lulu Belle. We’ve got Baxter, Frosty, Chloe, and Famous Shamus too. What are you waiting for?!

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