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Video: Genius dog figures out a way to beat the summer heat

Plus the best ways to keep your dog cool in the hot summer months

As the blistering heat continues this summer, people and pets are turning to all sorts of cooling methods to keep the days bearable. You may have discovered a few hacks for maintaining a reasonable temperature (more on those later), but this little guy has another idea for how to cool down a dog: a good old-fashioned fan. Watch as the dog genius in this video decides to take matters into his own paws to get the exact temperature he needs.

The TikTok starts out with a pup laying in his crate with the text “Smart dog gets too hot so he adjusts the fan.” He easily pushes the door open and walks over to a fan previously off-screen. Fido jumps up and uses his paws to push the cooling device a little bit, thereby making sure the air blows directly on his little home. Of course, he returns to his crate, now with the cooling breeze, and closes the door behind him (like a little gentleman). That’s why the caption states: He understood the assignment. Comments agreed with Mr. O remarking, “Too cute.” It’s certainly one of the cutest — and cleverest — things we’ve seen in a while.

A dog sits on a couch under a fan
Pixel-Shot / Shutterstock

How to cool down a dog during summer

You have to be careful when the weather gets hot because it’s pretty easy for our canine friends to overheat. Many dogs live in areas of the world that are much warmer than what they were bred for: Think a husky who resides in the American South. That situation requires even more proactive care to ensure the four-legged members of the family stay comfy. There are a few things you can do to help your pup regulate his temp starting with a lot of cool water.

  • Make sure he always has access to a big bowl of it and consider putting in a few ice cubes (lots of dogs love to chew on them anyway).
  • Additionally, consider where your dog spends the hot days, both his location and his furniture. If you don’t have a cooling system in your home, you may want to give your pooch access to the basement or, yes, even a fan.
  • Many dog beds will help them chill as well, especially if they are elevated or designed with cooling gel.
  • Lastly, consider calling it a pool day and taking your beastie to a place where the both of you can get in the water.

Remember never leave your pet unattended outdoors on a hot day and don’t lock him alone in the car, even for just a minute. By taking a few of these measures, you can guarantee that your furry friend will make it through the dog days of summer.

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Rebekkah Adams
Rebekkah’s been a writer and editor for more than 10 years, both in print and digital. In addition to writing about pets…
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